Cinzia Presti

Cinzia Presti, UMass Amherst Class of 2020, is completing a Classics and Art History double major and is active in archaeological fieldwork and digital related projects including image classification for the Pompeii Artistic Landscape Project and database maintenance for UMass Library’s Digital Scholarship Center. Cinzia’s academic interests in archaeology and Digital Humanities have been heavily influenced by her fieldwork experiences at both Etruscan and Roman sites such as Poggio Civitate Archaeological Project (2018) and the Tharros Archaeological Research Project (2019-2020) where she is a member of the project’s geospatial team. In her spare time, Cinzia enjoys studio art, hiking, and bouldering.

Access Cinzia Presti’s project site at:

https://bit.ly/3cAc4Ss

The Infrastructural Landscape of Ancient Tharos:

A GIS Approach to Recording a Roman City

Cinzia Presti’s research project titled, The Infrastructural Landscape of Ancient Tharos: A GIS Approach to Recording a Roman City, has consisted of mapping and analyzing Tharros’ infrastructural elements, including the city’s sewers and drains system, cisterns, and roads to better understand how this urban infrastructure impacted the daily lives of Romans living at Tharros. Specifically, her research seeks to determine potential paths for and volumes of drainage in the excavated and unexcavated portions of the city; illuminate the impact of the water systems such as access to water, urban planning, and rainwater and waste management; and analyze Tharros’ infrastructural elements in both domestic and public sections of the city.

During the Summer of 2019, Cinzia participated in the Tharros Archaeological Research Project in Sardinia, Italy where she collected primary data through a combination of ground survey and drone data of the topography to model the visible infrastructural systems of the city in ArcGIS. This assemblage of primary data has been used to define the location of drains and sewers in the excavated and unexcavated portions of the city and to determine its drainage basins, exit points, collection points, and permeable layers of water to better analyze the potential paths for and volumes of drainage throughout ancient Tharros. The materials for this project will contribute to the online Tharros Archaeological Research Project ArcGIS map, detailing the ancient cityscape, the sources and outflows of water, and a reconstruction of the roofing and water environment.